We've been drawn!

Frequent commenter and excellent artist Joseph Hewitt has immortalized us in colored pencil. Apparently I play the role of "pseudoscientific dogmatist." wut?

(click to see the full page)

While we're at it, here are a few more links to enjoy:

From the NY Times:

When a 12-year-old’s mother asks him “How many times do I have to tell you to stop?” he will understand that the answer, if any is required, had better not include a number.

But that insight requires a sophisticated understanding of ironic language that develops long after fluent speech. At what age do children begin to sense the meaning of such a question, and to what degree can they respond appropriately to other kinds of irony?

In laboratory research on the subject, children demonstrate almost no comprehension of ironic speech before they are 6 years old, and little before they are 10 or 11. When asked, younger children generally interpret rhetorical questions as literal, deliberate exaggeration as a mistake and sarcasm as a lie.

Also from the NYT:

Child Protective Services investigated more than three million cases of suspected child abuse in 2007, but a new study suggests that the investigations did little or nothing to improve the lives of those children.

Feel free to share other interesting links in the comments.

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